Posts tagged #education equality

TEACHED on Vimeo-on-Demand!

We are happy to announce that our first three short films, TEACHED Vol. I, are now available for streaming on Vimeo-on-Demand!  We made these films because we believe that more people need to understand how and why we still have a race-based "achievement gap" in the U.S. More people to understand the consequences of inaction especially for low-income urban youth who are hit hard by our failure to provide every student with an excellent educational experience.

Fatima Speaks: Access to the “Teaching Zone”

By Fatima Nasiyr

In Every Child Should Have Access to the “Teaching Zone”, TEACHED director and producer Kelly Amis interviews Carlet Harris, a young woman featured in our upcoming short film Think of Calvin, to gain perspective from a parent on the struggles of trying to ensure your child receives a decent education when you live in a low-income community. Why should anyone's child have to attend under-funded and under-resourced schools? And why should any child have to cope with a lackluster education just because of their zip code? How does this affect the student's, even the entire family's, future?

We are very grateful for our partnership with Education Post, which helps us share diverse voices On the Loudspeaker and encourage others to engage in critical dialogue on issues of equality and education.

To read our full piece featured on Education Post, go here. You can also listen to other voices we have featured On the Loudspeaker here, which includes interviews with prominent figures such as CNN correspondent Van Jones, performer and equal rights advocate John Legend, and --coming soon--Teach for America founder Wendy Kopp.

Kelly Speaks: Time to End Default Thinking on Race

As this year comes to a close, my heart breaks for Tamir Rice's family and to all the many others who have lost children to such senseless and violent acts with little to no accountability or justice to follow.

How could anyone watch the video of police driving up directly in front of Tamir and instantly shooting him without feeling the force of that bullet in one’s own chest?

What you can do

We have less than two weeks to go in our Kickstarter campaign to finish TEACHED Vol. II: three new short films about race, education and equality. You can watch the trailer for two of themon Kickstarter: Code Oakland and Think of Calvin.

Many independent film projects like ours rely on crowdfunding: lots of people giving what they can.

Please make a pledge today and share the news with everyone you know.

Other ways to help:

  • Send an email to 10+ friends! Copy, paste and send:
  • I made a pledge to this Kickstarter campaign for the awesome independent film project TEACHED, because I believe we need more ways to bring communities together for candid discussion around issues of race, equality and opportunity. TEACHED short films, produced and directed by former teacher and long-time education equality activist Kelly Amis, focus on the experiences of urban youth in America today. Please join me in helping TEACHED finish three new films; you can watch the trailer for the first one, "Code Oakland," and read more about the project, HERE.
  • Tweet for us! Copy, paste and tweet:
  • I made a pledge 2 @TEACHED Kickstarter b/c I believe in #edequality & the potential of all children. Pls join me! http://kck.st/1CHKgUG
  • Like us on Facebook and join our mailing list if you're not already on it; go to www.teached.org and fill out sign-up form on the right column.

Everything you do helps us one step forward. Have a great day and thank you for your support. We can't do it without you!

Early CJ Montae and Carlet.png

Race + Poverty = How You're Treated in American Education

These days, it has become totally acceptable for education leaders to blame poverty for our nation's achievement gap; to in effect say that all those kids can't learn in school because they're hungry, their families are dysfunctional, they are so far behind when they start Kindergarten that there's just no catching up, etc. These sweeping generalizations are very effective in removing all blame from the school system and preventing education reform efforts that could ensure that EVERY child receives the same quality of schools and teachers that wealthy students enjoy.